China’s first Aerial Cycleway opens to bikers

chinas-first-aerial-cycle-way-worst-practice
* * * STUNNING EXAMPLE OF A WORST PRACTICE * * *
Here’s their problem in a nutshell. They were asking themselves the wrong question.

What you see here is the results of decision makers and engineers’ response to the question (roughly):
“How can we give more safe space to bicycles and pedestrians in the city at this busy intersection, without slowing down and in due course reducing car traffic”.
And this is what they get. THEIR solution to THEIR problem.
But hold on a sec. If sustainability is their game (which it should be) then the right question ask would be closer to this:
“How can we at the same time (a) use bicycles and foot traffic (i.e., healthy, sustainable, active, cheap, zero-carbon, zero greenhouse gasses, democratic transport par excellence) to slow down and reduce (b) the ever-increasing number of dangerous, polluting, wasteful, space-hungry, costly, ) cars surging into our city day after day after day”.
Now that’s an interesting question. I leave it to you to decide how you think this important strategic objective can be best achieved. Your critical comments are warmly welcome.
# # #
It never ceases to amaze me how intelligent, serious, in many ways competent people can fall into this trap: that of rushing off into what they take as answers, before they have looked carefully at the full range of questions that need to be asked.  This very bad habit leads into a mindset and operational and investment pattern of which can be disastrous for a city.
china-beijing-heavy-traffic-on-ring-road.jpg (624×458)
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About the author:

Eric Britton
9, rue Gabillot, 69003 Lyon France

Bio: Trained as a development economist, Eric Britton is a public entrepreneur specializing in the field of sustainability and social justice. Professor of Sustainable Development, Economy and Democracy at the Institut Supérieur de Gestion (Paris), he is also MD of EcoPlan Association, an independent advisory network providing strategic counsel for government and business on policy and decision issues involving complex systems, social-technical change and sustainable development. Founding editor of World Streets, his latest work focuses on the subject of equity, economy and efficiency in city transport and public space, and helping governments to ask the right questions and in the process, find practical solutions to urgent climate, mobility, life quality and job creation issues. Currently working on an open collaborative project, “BETTER CHOICES: Bringing Sustainable Transportation to Smaller Asian Cities” . More at: http://wp.me/PsKUY-2p7 * This article is published under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 licence.

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