Archives. Andrew tries to get across the street in Penang.

CONGRATULATIONS ANDREW: Best one person transportation initiative that I have seen since first starting to follow developments in Penang in September 2013.

Continue reading

BETTER CHOICES: MAKING THE STRONGEST POSSIBLE CASE FOR THE PTMP

View of a meeting of highest echelon of state government members of PTMP ream, with selected PDP partners: the SRS Consortium.

Dear  Friends of Penang,

As part of our 2013-2019 Watching Brief on the realities of the sustainable transport/mobility/access planning and policy  in Penang Malaysia, it is important that we present fully and fairly the position of local government and their allies in formulating and leading their on-going “Penang Transport Master Plan” (PTMP).

We want to present their best case for their ambitious long term venture. For now we have posted on the Sustainable Penang website, a total of eight documents/references setting out their point of view, including the government’s latest position papers on the on-going Penang Transport Master Plan. You will find them with hot links for easy referencing on the upper right hand column of the site at https://sustainablepenang.wordpress.com and also here just below:

Continue reading

Planning and Policy Objectives for a Real Strategic Transport Plan for Penang

FB SP ciil society plus traffic copAgain and again and again, when it comes to “transport master planning” in Penang, it seems as if we always end up circling to the same old structurally wrong thing. And in the process allowing the under-trained proponents of the Big Bang “solution” of the present government package, to occupy the center of the debate. This is a huge mistake.

It is my position that the starting place for responsible and effective transport planning and policy in Penang is NOT to link it to land deals —  but to look at the challenge in and of itself. From a well defined, explicit strategic perspective.

Some will say that they do not have enough money to accomplish their objectives — which quickly become wild, pharaonic, costly and not related to the real problems and priorities at hand. Remember, transport for people and not for cars (infrastructure included)

Here is the simple question that the policy makers need to be asked and required to resolve.

(a) What is it that they can accomplish for the people of Penang,

(b) working with available resources in order to

(c) alleviate the day-to-day mobility problems of the people of Penang – with

(d) especial attention to the needs of the poorer half of society and the vulnerable populations (elderly, handicapped, poor, isolated, non-car owners, and

(e) above all women of all ages and stations of life, and in

(f) in the coming three years, i.e., 2018-2020.

How hard is that? And why is no one minding this store?

Let’s open up a lively public dialogue between State government and their principal suppliers/partners, civil society

# # #

About the author:

Eric Britton
13, rue Pasteur. Courbevoie 92400 France

Bio: Founding editor of World Streets (1988), Eric Britton is an American political scientist, teacher, occasional consultant, mediator and sustainability activist who has observed, learned, taught and worked on missions and advisory assignments on all continents. In the autumn of 2019, he committed his remaining life work to the challenges of aggressively countering climate change and specifically greenhouse gas emissions emanating from the mobility sector. He is not worried about running out of work. Further background and updates: @ericbritton | http://bit.ly/2Ti8LsX | #fekbritton | https://twitter.com/ericbritton | and | https://www.linkedin.com/in/ericbritton/ Contact: climate@newmobility.org) | +336 508 80787 (Also WhatApp) | Skype: newmobility.)

View complete profile

 

Naming Names: In defense of the public interest in Panang

 

It would be most interesting for those of us looking in from outside, to see a “Naming Names” chart, which identifies those individuals, political groups, companies, financial groups, captive media, and lobbies who from all appearances have taken over the governance process in Penang in a variety of vital areas, and moved the decision process over radically to a consistent, unsustainable, inequitable and inefficient model of environmental, economic, and social development.

Including of course all of those outside forces ready at the drop of a hat to support the lack of a strong model for a Sustainable Penang.

Anybody up for taking a first stab at this, which can then perhaps be extended and articulated as part of an open collaborative process?

Continue reading

Towards Sustainable Transport in Malaysia – What we already knew in 2001 and are steadfastly ignoring today

Penang Changing Directions - color

The Consumer Association of Penang organized a National Seminar on Changing directions from 7-10 September 2001  in Penang, subsequent to which a report was published and we now make  freely available here in its entirety at https://goo.gl/kQVD0T. This is a remarkably prescient document which was largely ignored at the time despite the vigorous effort of the Consumers’ Association of Penang and others in the city’s lively civil society and NGOs.  Somehow neither Penang or the national government were prepared to devote time and resources to finding the path to sustainable transport in cities. (And they were not the only ones.)

The policy of directly or indirectly encouraging the use of private motor cars and motorcycles to meet the transport needs of our people has had severe effects on the quality of life in the cities and on the economy and efficiency of urban transportation.

Continue reading

Planning and Policy Objectives for a Real Strategic Transport Plan for Penang

shell-lgame-as-depicted-by-bosch

Again and again and again, when it comes to “transport master planning” in Penang, it seems as if we always end up circling to the same old structurally wrong thing. And in the process allowing the undertrained proponents of the Big Bang “solution” of the present government package, to occupy the center of the debate. This is a huge mistake.

It is my position that the starting place for responsible and effective transport planning and policy in Penang is NOT to link it to land deals —  but to look at the challenge in and of itself. From a well defined, explicit strategic perspective.

Some will say that they do not have enough money to accomplish their objectives — which quickly become wild, pharaonic, costly and not related to the real problems and priorities at hand. Remember, transport for people and not for cars (infrastructure included)

Here is the simple question that the policy makers need to ask and resolve.

(a) What is it that they can accomplish for the people of Penang,

(b) working with available resources in order to

(c) alleviate the day-to-day mobility problems of the people of Penang – with

(d) especial attention to the needs of the poorer half of society and the vulnerable populations (elderly, handicapped, poor, isolated, non-car owners, and

(e) above all women of all ages and stations of life, and in

(f) in the coming four years, i.e., 2017-2020.

How hard is that? And why is no one minding this store?

Please someone, tell me why this is not being done?

# # #

About the author:

Eric Britton
13, rue Pasteur. Courbevoie 92400 France

Bio: Founding editor of World Streets (1988), Eric Britton is an American political scientist, teacher, occasional consultant, mediator and sustainability activist who has observed, learned, taught and worked on missions and advisory assignments on all continents. In the autumn of 2019, he committed his remaining life work to the challenges of aggressively countering climate change and specifically greenhouse gas emissions emanating from the mobility sector. He is not worried about running out of work. Further background and updates: @ericbritton | http://bit.ly/2Ti8LsX | #fekbritton | https://twitter.com/ericbritton | and | https://www.linkedin.com/in/ericbritton/ Contact: climate@newmobility.org) | +336 508 80787 (Also WhatApp) | Skype: newmobility.)

View complete profile

 

Op-Ed. Andrew tries to get across the street in Penang.

CONGRATULATIONS ANDREW: Best one person transportation initiative that I have seen since first starting to follow developments in Penang in September 2013.

Continue reading